tangodressage:

Promise this is the last previous dressage blog I will run- please feel free to comment on any of the posts! that’s my favorite part- generally the comments are better than my posts!

Originally posted on Tango Dressage Blog:

Reading the responses and postings from adult amateur riders compels me to address a common misunderstanding between instructor and instructee.  In a fellow blogger’s comment section I referenced the different psyches involved with teaching teenagers and teaching adults. (see comments)  This generated some discussion on why adults may have specific concerns.  Alas,  I too am an adult and have indeed suffered injuries from riding.  I however, seem to believe more in some adults than they believe in themselves.  This is usually illustrated when we first meet and are setting long-term goals.  Almost invariably if I ask a teenager what they would like to accomplish they say “I want to ride in the Olympics.”  Lofty goals indeed.  We then discuss what kind of dedication is involved in reaching that kind of commitment.  When I ask an adult with seemingly the same ambition and enthusiasm the identical question I usually get a somewhat…

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Sweep your Cares Away….

August 18, 2014

tangodressage:

this was one of my more popular posts- still seems to apply!

Originally posted on Tango Dressage Blog:

The trends in horse care have changed considerably over the past few decades. For many, a shift has been made from the backyard barn to the bigger boarding facilities. With economic dips forcing job constraints on precious horsey time, more people are inclined to pay a facility to give their horse the day-to-day care they once provided themselves.

On a daily basis I am fortunate enough to travel to many such facilities. Enough praise cannot be heaped on the generous souls who commit their life to caring for horses. It is a twenty-four hour a day job and is often underappreciated.

When I hear a fussy boarder complain about trivial matters I ask them the amount of board they pay per month. I then divide that number by thirty, and figure a per day price for their horse board. In our area it usually runs fifteen to twenty dollars per…

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tangodressage:

This is an old one I posted years ago but I believe it still holds true- Feel free to comment on blog- I can take it!

Originally posted on Tango Dressage Blog:

1 Connemara + 2 shows = 1 Bronze Medal

Almost everyone in the dressage community can tell you the bloodlines of the horses winning in topsport dressage.  Breeding  programs in the United States have become increasingly popular and successful.  Almost every page in dressage magazines boasts advertisements of well-bred, super athletic, descendents of top scoring dressage horses.   If the price is right it is even possible to purchase a clone of one of these world-renowned athletes.  With the availability of these super athletes burgeoning every year there are only two questions left to answer.  Can I afford him?  Can I ride him?

While it is true that to place successfully in dressage, a warmblood of quality breeding is the most obvious choice; however, to show successfully or to ride successfully, a top-bred warmblood is not the only option.  In fact, depending on the experience and athleticism of the rider, a big, fancy moving horse can be intimidating and frustrating.  This is fantastic for the professional…

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Oh, Atlanta….

August 17, 2014

“Oh, Atlanta, I hear you callin’
I’m comin’ back to you one fine day…..”    Ralph Micks

 

 

atlhorseconnections

Click to check out local magazine Atlanta Horse Connections

 

 

In 1995 I traveled to Atlanta to audit a Charles DeKunffy clinic hosted in Alpharetta, Georgia.  As I wound my way around the charming towns of Roswell, Milton and Alpharetta I knew that I had found the place I wanted to live.  Within a year my horse Sy and I moved from South Carolina and found ourselves living in the place I consider “home”.

Home has always been an elusive concept for me as I was raised in the Air Force and lived in three different countries and four different states before I graduated high school.  I loved every one of these places and the horses, barns and friends that I met along the way.  From riding gymkhana and jumping ponies with Andrea in England to beginning dressage and show jumping with the German kids at the stately riding center in Zweibrucken, Germany, Europe began my love for all things horsey.

Lucky enough to land at Sand and Spur Riding Club on Eglin Air Force Base in Fort Walton Beach, Florida I met an amazing family of people that shaped my life.  The friends I met there are second to none.  I consider the times at workday, riding in the bay, and club horse shows some of the best times I will ever have.  Unfortunately due to the nature of the military the people that aligned in that magical period of time have since scattered across the globe.

South Carolina and Longcreek Equestrian Center introduced me to Scott Peterson who unknowingly converted me to a dressage only rider.  It is here that I found my path to my career in horses.  I met Sabrena (of Better So Dressage Blog) a friend that encourages me when I’m down and shares my passion for dressage. I wouldn’t trade any of these places or experiences for anything in the world.  They are what made me the trainer I am today.  But it is in Georgia that I will always feel most at home.

For fear of excluding any one of the hundreds of friends, trainers and students I have known in Atlanta I won’t name any names but Atlanta is the place I will return to when my duties in South Carolina are complete.  In addition to the huge community of riders, Atlanta has hundreds of amazing barns to meet the needs of all. Most of all it is the supportive nature of the people I have met there that keeps drawing me back.  Atlanta has seen the best of me and the worst of me, I have made lifelong friends and I have made some big mistakes but somehow that all becomes part of the fold and the focus on horses keeps bringing us back together.

I wish I had the words to better express how I feel but I guess I can’t top the great Ray Charles….

Georgia, Georgia
The whole day through
(The whole day through)
Just an old sweet song
Keeps Georgia on my mind
(Georgia on my mind)

I said a Georgia, Georgia
A song of you
Comes as sweet and clear
As moonlight through the pines

Other arms reach out to me
Other eyes smile tenderly
Still in the peaceful dreams I see
The road leads back to you

I said, Georgia, oh Georgia
No peace I find
Just an old sweet song
Keeps Georgia on my mind

Other arms reach out to me
Other eyes smile tenderly
Still in peaceful dreams I see
The road leads back to you

Oh Georgia, Georgia
No peace, no peace I find
Just an old, sweet song
Keeps Georgia on my mind
(Georgia on my mind)

I said, just an old sweet song
Keeps Georgia on my mind – Ray Charles

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Doesn’t Matter

August 9, 2014

Me and Jim Dorsett after my fall

Me and Jim Dorsett after my fall

Admittedly it took me smashing both my legs and spending a year in a wheelchair before I felt empathy for fearful riders.  Although I knew all the catch phrases to try and teach someone that was afraid,- “he’s not going to do anything”, “nothing’s going to happen”, “doesn’t matter”, I really didn’t understand that it was a physical problem to be frightened, not a mental one.

It’s easy to stand on the ground when someone is fearful and logically explain why they have nothing to fear, or even what to do if they experience loss of control.  These are things most people can understand and conceptualize, however; when a person has been hurt, or just has a fear of being hurt no logical understanding overrides the blast of adrenaline that shoots through their body causing a cold sweat to break out on their forehead.

If you are trying to teach, or help someone that has this fear, understand that they want to get through it or they wouldn’t be there.  If possible get on the horse first and show them how quietly he goes around the arena without spooking or falling.  Sometimes it’s helpful when the rider is on the horse to get them talking about something else in their life, maybe their family or their job, to distract them from the situation for a minute.  This will keep them from over analyzing their ride.  Put a grab strap on the saddle or a stirrup leather around the horse’s neck for them to grab if they feel the need to.  If they become overwhelmed with fear and feel like they must get off the horse try to be supportive and understanding, even if you have never felt this way yourself.  Everything doesn’t have to be conquered in one day.

If you are a rider that has experienced a bad fall or is fearful for some other reason, realize you are not alone.  Many people feel fear and express it as anger or frustration.  Don’t be embarrassed to talk to your trainer about your fears.  This will save a lot of time and confusion if the fear is getting in the way of training.  Never feel “less than” because you are afraid.  Eventually most everyone gets to experience this most unpleasant of feelings.

It took a long time after I began riding again to feel confident enough to train a horse again as opposed to just sitting there fear struck.  Fear can be overcome but it never goes away completely once it  becomes a part of your psyche.  If you have a bad day just spend the time on the ground with your horse and don’t let one uncomfortable feeling keep you from what you love. Get back in the saddle tomorrow, it will be a better day.  I promise.

 

 

Check the Frequency

August 7, 2014

“If you want to find the secrets of the universe, think in terms of energy, frequency and vibration.” ~ Nikola Tesla

frequency

 

Whether you’re looking for a new horse or just lucky enough for the opportunity to ride many different horses it is important for a rider to gauge the “frequency” or energy level of the horse to be ridden.  People with a lot of experience or particularly good feel do this, on a subconscious level, by sensing tension in the horse’s body and observing body language and facial expressions that indicate the horse’s reaction to the rider or environment.  A misjudgment of the frequency can not only make for a bad ride but can be dangerous to the horse and rider as well.

Like the horse, a rider carries an innate level of energy.  A particularly fearful, or frenetic rider carries what I would describe as a high frequency. This type of rider generally does well on a lazier, or low frequency horse.  With little effort the lazy horse moves more forward when paired with the high frequency rider.  This same rider on a high frequency or hot blooded horse causes chaos and runs the risk of being out of control.

Similarly the low frequency rider, one that is not easily rattled and carries themselves with a sense of calm, is best suited for the high frequency horse.  The pairing of the low frequency rider on a low frequency horse generally makes for a painfully sluggish and boring ride.  This rider lends a calming effect to the high frequency horse, pulling the frequency down to a ridable level.  To be able to successfully ride all types of horses a rider must be able to control and alter their own frequency level.

Like most exercises, learning to alter your energy level begins in a contrived fashion; however, with time and practice this becomes second nature.  Using imagery and breathing techniques common to meditation, practice exhaling tension out of your body and relaxing your muscles consciously when your horse’s energy level rises, even if you are mentally anxious.  Expect that when you exaggerate your relaxation it will pull the frequency level of your horse down, closer to a level where communication can continue.  If your horse is lazy, a low frequency type, imagine an electric current vibrating through your body and mentally increase the voltage until you notice your horse reacting to your aids more promptly.

Whether it is learned or inherent in a rider, a relative gauge of frequency  is necessary for effective communication to be achieved.   Understand the frequency and master controlling it and you will positively increase the level of communication you share with your horse.  Better communication between you and your horse causes good vibrations.  Ohm…..

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032

Thanks Dad, for everything

 

Well, Back to the blog again anyway! It’s been quite a hiatus and I’ve missed my readers and fellow bloggers, but like true friendships a time lapse won’t matter.

I’m in a different state now, geographically anyway, and spend most of my day caring for my elderly father. Although it has altered the way my horse career operates I wouldn’t have it any other way. I am fortunate to have a career doing what I love because my family made the sacrifices necessary for a horse obsessed little girl. For that I will always be grateful.

This change in schedule has given me less time to teach, but more time to write and I’m hoping we can resume the conversations I have always appreciated with my old friends and hopefully some new ones too.

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